Search

Advanced Search

Share|

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia

This indicator shows the age-adjusted death rate per 100,000 population due to influenza and pneumonia.

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia

14.4
17.4
Comparison: CA Counties 

12.0

deaths/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2010-2012

County: Marin

Categories: Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases, Health / Respiratory Diseases, Health / Mortality Data
Technical Note: The distribution is based on data from 57 California counties.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: April 2014

Why is this important?

In 2007, influenza and pneumonia ranked eighth among the leading causes of death in the United States. The two diseases are traditionally reported together, as pneumonia is frequently a complication of influenza. Influenza is a contagious disease caused by a virus. The number of influenza deaths can fluctuate considerably from one year to the next as influenza can be caused by more virulent virus strains in some years than others as the viruses constantly mutate. Pneumonia is a serious infection of the lungs that develops when the immune system is weakened. It is mainly caused by bacteria, viruses, and mycoplasmas. Typically there are more deaths from pneumonia than influenza. Persons most at risk include the elderly, the very young, and the immune-compromised.

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia : Time Series

2002-2004: 20.6 2003-2005: 16.6 2004-2006: 15.6 2005-2007: 14.3 2006-2008: 14.8 2007-2009: 13.6 2008-2010: 14.7 2009-2011: 12.3 2010-2012: 12.0

deaths/100,000 population

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia

Comparison: Prior Value 

12.0

deaths/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2010-2012

County: Marin

Categories: Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases, Health / Respiratory Diseases, Health / Mortality Data
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: April 2014

Why is this important?

In 2007, influenza and pneumonia ranked eighth among the leading causes of death in the United States. The two diseases are traditionally reported together, as pneumonia is frequently a complication of influenza. Influenza is a contagious disease caused by a virus. The number of influenza deaths can fluctuate considerably from one year to the next as influenza can be caused by more virulent virus strains in some years than others as the viruses constantly mutate. Pneumonia is a serious infection of the lungs that develops when the immune system is weakened. It is mainly caused by bacteria, viruses, and mycoplasmas. Typically there are more deaths from pneumonia than influenza. Persons most at risk include the elderly, the very young, and the immune-compromised.

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia : Time Series

2002-2004: 20.6 2003-2005: 16.6 2004-2006: 15.6 2005-2007: 14.3 2006-2008: 14.8 2007-2009: 13.6 2008-2010: 14.7 2009-2011: 12.3 2010-2012: 12.0

deaths/100,000 population